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Cherry Blossom Festival - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

This is one of the peaks of the past nine months I’ve spent in Washington, DC. I was eager to see the famous cherry blossoms around the tidal basin, near the Jefferson Memorial. They have reached peak bloom this past weekend, and that was absolutely lovely.

Cherry Blossoms near the Jefferson Memorial - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

Cherry Blossoms and the Washington Monument - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

Cherry Blossom Festival - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

So yes, my promise to write my first post in 2016 from Texas is now gone. The back and forth between Austin and DC has stopped until I go back to Austin for good, in a few weeks. More on this in a later post.

For now, let’s go back to spring in Washington, DC.

Cherry Blossoms - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

The Cherry Blossom Festival originates from a gift of 2,000 cherry trees that the city of Tokyo made to Washington, DC in 1912. On March 27, 1912, First Lady Helen Herron Taft and Japanese Viscountess Iwa Chinda, the wife of Sutemi Chinda, Japan’s newly appointed ambassador to the United States, planted the first two trees. In 1965, First Lady Lady Bird Johnson accepted an additional 3,800 trees. The first festival took place in 1927, was expanded to three days in 1934, and to two weeks in 1994.

Cherry Blossom Festival - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

Cherry Blossoms - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

The U.S. reciprocated the gifts, sending Japan flowering dogwood trees in 1915. In 1981, DC arborists sent cuttings from the newly American cherry trees following the destruction of Japanese trees by a flood in Japan.

The cherry blossoms are of course especially impressive around the Tidal Basin, but you can find many in the entire region. According to some figures, more than 1,000 cherry trees were planted in recent years in the region.

Cherry Blossom Festival - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

Cherry Blossoms - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

Jefferson Memorial, Cherry Blossoms - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

Horticulturists from the National Park Service monitor different stages of bud development to be able to give an estimate of when the cherry blossoms will reach peak bloom. But of course, this is not an easy job. This year, the initial forecast was for early April, but was adjusted a few weeks ago and moved forward after warmer than usual weather.

Cherry Blossoms - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

Cherry Blossom Festival - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

Cherry Blossom Festival - Washington, DC | Books, Cupcakes, and Cats Chasing Chipmunks

In conclusion, the region is incredibly beautiful when spring comes, and well worth a visit.

As you can see from the pictures, there were a lot of people (I read that 1.5 million people come to see the cherry blossoms each year), and the weather was not sunny, which was challenging to come up with good photographs. Hopefully though, they will still give you an idea of the beauty of the event.

Source of information & additional links:
National Cherry Blossom Festival
This Day in History: March 27, 1912 – Japanese cherry trees planted along the Potomac
Cherry Blossom Watch
Cherry Blossoms in 360°

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